Spot-on article and comments in Daily Kos on teacher burnout

Excellent article on why many teachers are retiring early or just quitting.

I recommend the comments as well. (I am so glad I was able to retire in 2009!)

 

A quote or two:

Last fall, Kris Nielsen, who had moved to North Carolina specifically for a teaching job after years teaching in New Mexico and Oregon, wrote, “I am quitting without remorse and without second thoughts” because:

I refuse to be led by a top-down hierarchy that is completely detached from the classrooms for which it is supposed to be responsible.

I will not spend another day under the expectations that I prepare every student for the increasing numbers of meaningless tests.

I refuse to be an unpaid administrator of field tests that take advantage of children for the sake of profit. […]

I’m tired of watching my students produce amazing things, which show their true understanding of 21st century skills, only to see their looks of disappointment when they don’t meet the arbitrary expectations of low-level state and district tests that do not assess their skills.

In spring 2012, the “worst eighth-grade math teacher in New York City” decided to leave teaching. Not much of a loss if she was the worst, right? Yeah, well, Carolyn Abbott was teaching at a gifted-and-talented school, where:

The material covered on the state eighth-grade math exam is taught in the fifth or sixth grade at Anderson. “I don’t teach the curriculum they’re being tested on,” Abbott explained. “It feels like I’m being graded on somebody else’s work.”

The math that she teaches is more advanced, culminating in high-school level algebra and a different and more challenging test, New York State’s Regents exam in Integrated Algebra. To receive a high school diploma in the state of New York, students must demonstrate mastery of the New York State learning standards in mathematics by receiving a score of 65 or higher on the Regents exam. In 2010-11, nearly 300,000 students across the state of New York took the Integrated Algebra Regents exam; most of the 73 percent who passed the exam with a score of 65 or higher were tenth-graders. […]

How do her students perform on the content that she actually does teach? This year, the 64 eighth-graders at Anderson she teaches are divided into two groups, an honors section and a regular section. All but one of the students in the honors section took the Regents Integrated Algebra exam in January; the other student and most of the regular-section students will take the exam in June. All of the January test-takers passed with flying colors, and more than one-third achieved a perfect score of 100 on the exam.

Published in: on February 24, 2013 at 8:11 pm  Comments (1)  
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One CommentLeave a comment

  1. I retired after thirty five years of teaching math and physics at the high school level. I also spent twenty of those years coaching two sports. I was having a great time and I had a great job, but I had maxed out my retirement percentage and no real raises were coming for the next contract. I would essentially be working for $5000 a year.
    I stayed awake for all the faculty meetings during my last year and got to hear how a “value-added” component was proposed for upcoming evaluations. I felt sympathy for the department heads who had to try to explain how this would work. At some point I was happy to be leaving. The teachers I left behind are working their tails off and doing a great job. I miss them, but I don’t miss going to school every day.

    Like


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