More on those supposedly wonderful DCPS NAEP TUDA scores…

In this post, let us look at how the District of Columbia Public Schools fared on the Trial Urban District Assessment sub-set of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. I think you will agree that there has been no significant change in trends if you compare the pre-Rhee era and the post-Rhee era, which we are in now. None of these graphs were made by me: I merely copied and pasted them from the NAEP website, and added a little color and a few labels.

The next graph shows the average scores on the NAEP for 8th-grade math for DC Public Schools and for all large-city public school systems in the US. You will have to look very hard to notice any change in slope for the lower, blue line, which represents DCPS, on either side of the orange vertical line, which separates the pre-Rhee era from the post-Rhee era.

dcps and large urban public schools math 8th grade

The next graph shows the average scores on the NAEP for 8th-grade reading in DCPS and all other large urban school systems. There has been no large change in either the national scores or the local DCPS scores since 2002, but I guess the best we can say that after two periods of small declines after mayoral control was imposed in 2007, the scores actually went up a bit in 2013 in DC. However, DCPS students on the whole are a little farther behind other urban kids now, under Chancellor Henderson, than they were at any time in the era before Rhee. But the changes are not very large or significant.

dcps and large urban public schools 8th grade reading

dcps and large urban public schools math 4th grade

The previous graph shows average Math NAEP scores for fourth-graders in DCPS and all other urban districts. Do you really see any big changes in the trends for DCPS scores? They have been going up rather steadily since 2003… It’s nice to see that DCPS kids seem to be catching up with those in other cities, but that was happening anyway.

My last graph in this post is for fourth-grade reading. It looks like I forgot to draw the vertical line separating the pre-Rhee and post-Rhee eras. Draw it in yourself. Do you see evidence of the supposed miracles that getting rid of 90% of the veteran teachers and school administrators, and hiring enormous numbers of inexperienced, highly-paid central-office administrators, has caused?

I surely don’t.

dcps and large urban public schools reading 4th grade

In a future post, I will actually dive a little deeper and ask how much of these changes (or lack thereof) are due to changing demographics….

I will also attempt to tease out how the privately-run charter schools in DC compare..

Published in: on December 19, 2013 at 1:37 pm  Comments (6)  
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6 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. GF,

    Please check the change in racial composition in grade 4 DC.

    Black enrollment dropped from 88 to 67.

    Gentrification?

    Diane

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  2. […] the past few posts, (#1, #2, #3) I’ve merely cut-and-pasted graphs or text that the National Center for Educational […]

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  3. […] line conclusion from my last bunch of posts (see #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, […]

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  4. It looks like the large city results and DC’s proceed in verable lockstep. I can corrrelations city vs DC on your numbers:
    Results
    grade 8 math r = 0.972,
    grade 8 reading r = 0.506,
    grade 4 math r = 0.924,
    grade 4 reading r = 0.926

    Do correlations this high make sense?
    I lack subject knowledge and I don’t live in the USA so maybe they do but a r of 0.972 seems amazingly high.

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    • What you are saying leads to an important point, namely, that scores on the NAEP are going up all over the United States and have been doing so for a very long time; and the increases that we see in DCPS mirror those in large urban school systems overall.

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      • No problem with the increasing scores it’s just that a correlation of 0.97 seems high but as I said, “I lack subject knowledge and I don’t live in the USA”.

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