Even more on the DC-CAS and the NAEP

In this installment, I’ll look at the reading scores for the District of Columbia as reported on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and by DC’s Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) by way of the DC-CAS (Comprehensive Assessment Program), written and published by CTB-McGraw Hill.

You may have noticed that I’ve been reporting ‘Average Scale Scores’ on both tests, rather than achievement levels — proficient, advanced, below basic and basic. It was suggested to me that this would allow us to compare the two tests (national and ‘state’) more directly, since the decision of what score falls in which category is so obviously open to negotiation and ‘fudging’ by powers-that-be.

In any case, I will continue giving Average Scale Scores, first for 4th graders in reading:

naep + dccas for 4th grade reading compared

As before, the blue scale is the average scale score for DC’s fourth-graders in reading, divided by five so that it would fit on the same grid as the DC-CAS scores for the same subject, same grade level. As before, the DC-CAS scale scores for the fourth grade go from 400 to 499, which I treat as going from 0 to 100, and the NAEP scores go from 0 to 500. As before, I had to find these scores in a variety of places; I gave the URLs in the previous post. Also, for a couple of years, I found two different scores for the same year, so I plotted and reported both of them.

You will notice that since about 1996, which is almost two decades, the scores on the NAEP for successive cohorts of Washington DC fourth-graders have been more or less slowly increasing, and there does not seem to be much difference between that progress before mayoral control of DC schools (labeled “Pre-Rhee”) and after the imposition of mayoral control of the schools (which I labeled “Post-Rhee”).

That’s the blue line.

However, the red line, representing the locally-funded DC-CAS tests for the same grade level, show much more volatility and overall growth, with the jump from 2007 to 2008 being most suspicious of all, knowing what we now know about the degree to which Michelle Rhee instructed each and every principal in DCPS to magically raise test scores or get fired.

Once again, I would much prefer to rely on the federal National Center for Educational Statistics than I would rely on CTB-McGraw Hill or the very-political appointees to DC’s OSSE.

Lastly, I present an image with the same pair of graphs, but  for 8th grade reading:

naep + dccas for 8th grade reading compared

The same comments apply here as with every one of the other three tests. NAEP scores show a little bit of steady growth since 1998 (16 years ago), whereas the DC-CAS seems to show less even but much more impressive growth since 2006.

As usual, I would very much discount what Mayor Gray, Chancellor Henderson, OSSE or CTB-McGraw-Hill have to say. I would recommend that you put much more trust in the federal civil servants at NCES and NAEP.

What about you?

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Links to my other articles on this:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three (all reading) — this one right here

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Similar results in Dallas and here in Buffalo indicate clearly that when teachers are ordered to improve their test scores, they will improve their test scores. They recognize that they are being ordered to cheat and they do so.

    Sometimes the results are so transparent that they are laughable. One school in Buffalo went from worst to best in one year and the then Secretary of Education came to honor the principal.

    Like

  2. […] Part One  (fourth grade math) […]

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  3. […] Part One  (fourth grade math)— this one right here […]

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