“Private Profiteer Schools on the Public Dole” – Valerie Jablow

Privatizers in charge of public schools – the sad cases of Antwon Wilson, Betsy Devos, DFER, and many others, from Valerie Jablow at EducationDC dot net:

Meet Our New Public Education Personnel: Just Like the Old Ones (Only More So)

Amway is an illegal pyramid scheme.

It’s surprising how quiet the media have been about how corrupt Amway is, the company which made Betsy DeVos rich enough to have sufficient clout to be able to ruin public education?

Did you know that they had to pay $150 million just a few years ago? I had no idea. Goiing by what I wrote previously about Multi-Level Marketing (the polite name for modern pyramid schemes), the FTC and other regulatory groups treat Amway and their peers with kid gloves not because it’s not a fraud and a con, but because a lot of Senators and Representatives in both parties are beneficiaries of these Ponzi schemes. So whenever an agency tries to stop this Ponzi mess, there is immediate pushback from another branch of government.

Here is some analysis that appeared in 2010, just after Amway was hit with this ruling:

Among the accusations made in the Amway class action suit that resulted in Amway’s agreement to pay $150 million (the suit was technically brought against Quixtar, the now defunct name used by Amway for its North American operations):

* Amway is an illegal pyramid scheme.
* Amway’s Kingpin companies that sell “motivation and training” products to recruits are also an illegal pyramid scheme.
* Amway criminally violates federal racketeering law.
* Amway violates California’s “endless chain” law.
* Amway masks “criminal behavior” with claims that it is in compliance with a federal Amway ruling of more than 25 years ago. In fact, Amway is not in compliance with the ruling.
* Amway induces salespeople to buy thousands of dollars of overpriced products and useless “success tools” and then to recruit others to do the same in an endless chain scheme that dooms, by design, nearly all to losses.
* Amway deliberately deceives consumers to enroll in the pyramid scheme in which they inevitably suffer financial loss.
* Amway’s arbitration rule which is intended to prevent victim lawsuits against it is unfair and “unconscionable”.
* Amway commits wire fraud and mail fraud.

Published in: on November 24, 2016 at 8:07 am  Comments (4)  

The Only Worse Possible Candidate for U.S. EdSec than Michelle Rhee was Betsy Devos. So, Devos it is.

Two really bad pieces of news:

  1. Betsy DeVos, a billionaire who pushes vouchers so that she can dismantle all public schools, has been named by His Orange Fraudulency to be the next US Secretary of Education. Because the only worse possible candidate for US EdSec would be Michelle Rhee, and apparently she was busy shining her coffin. The DeVos family got their billions by bilking thousands (millions?) of people who didn’t realize that Amway is really just a pyramid (or Ponzi) scheme. It makes perfect sense that a fraud like Trump would appoint someone like DeVos, who got her billions from fraud, as well. Teachers and public school students can look forward to very grim times. Read this the indefatigable and inimitable Peter Greene for more details.
  2. Apparently somewhere between 20% and 33% of American teachers actually voted for the fellow who will shaft them even worse than they have been shafted under Arne Duncan and Barack Obama.

What to do about Trump– by someone who has lived under an autocrat much like him

Masha Geffen has good advice about what we should do now that this toxic person has been elected:

Autocracy: Rules for Survival

Published in: on November 22, 2016 at 4:21 pm  Leave a Comment  

Separate and Unequal Rises Again: How Divide-And-Rule Hurts both White and Black Students in Alabama

How to make America Great again and have the white south feel like they are rising again: Jeff Sessions’ efforts to ensure Alabama’s schools stay separate, unequal, and inferior to all other states:

How he fought to preserve Alabama’s long history of separate and unequal education.
MOBILE.NYTIMES.COM|BY THOMAS J. SUGRUE
Published in: on November 22, 2016 at 2:35 pm  Leave a Comment  

An Alliance Between Liars Rhee and Trump?

Juan Vasquez Heilig goes into some of the background:

Top 5 Reasons @TeachForAmerica and ed reformers LOVE Trump and Rhee

Published in: on November 22, 2016 at 1:41 pm  Leave a Comment  

An Immodest Proposal

If you look at the lingo used to justify all the horrendous crap being imposed by “Ed reform”, you’ll see that it’s all couched in lefty-liberal civil rights language. But its results are anything but. Very strange.

Q: Can you cite some examples?

GFB: Yes. From the TFA website:

“Everyone has a right to learn. But in our country today, the education you receive depends on where you live, what your parents earn, and the color of your skin.

“That’s a serious injustice. And in the national movement to right  our contribution is the leadership of remarkable people.

“Our people—diverse and passionate—start in low-income classrooms, where the stakes are highest. We help them become teachers who can dramatically expand students’ opportunities. But our teachers don’t just teach their students, they learn from them.

“They gain a better understanding of the problems and the opportunities in our education system and use those lessons to define their path forward. Many stay in the classroom. Others leave. Both paths matter because to set things right, we need leaders in all areas of education and social justice united in a vision that one day, all kids will have access to an excellent education.”

GFB: However, the way TFA works in practice is that the kids who need the most experienced, skillful teachers, instead get total newbies straight out of college with no teaching experience, no mentoring, and courses on how to teach whatever subject they are they are assigned to. Their five weeks of summer training are mostly rah-rah cheerleading and browbeating. Their only classroom experiences during that summer are a dozen or so hours teaching a handful of kids, **in a subject or grade level totally different from whatever they will be randomly assigned to**.

What underprivileged students do NOT need is an untrained newbie who won’t stick with them. If anything, this policy INCREASES the ‘achievement gap’.

Q: I’m sorry Guy, but none of this poses a solution. Paying the teachers more is not the answer. I know this because I would quit my engineering job in a heartbeat to teach. I honestly would. And I would do it for 1/4 the pay. But not under these  conditions. Not with “father education” telling me how to use fancy calculators to educate kids. Not when you take what I love about math and turn it into garbage. The paradigm sucks, independent of the lousy pay.

GFB: That’s yet another reason to oppose Michelle Rhee. She and her allies have figured out how to micromanage teaching down to the minute and to the very sentences teachers are required to read — from a script. Yes, she and Jason Kamras and Raj Chetty and the other billionaires friends have made it that teachers have no say whatsoever on content or methodology.

If they are not on the same page exactly, down to the minute, they can get marked down, harassed, suspended and fired.

Want to teach under those conditions for twice the pay? Me neither.

It’s not “Teach Like A Champion” as Doug Lemov puts it: it’s teach like a robot.

Q: Plus, their answer to teaching is to integrate technology. They think that if they use technology, everybody will be prepared for the “real world”. Unfortunately, the technology they use isn’t utilized in the real world. So…useless. Somebody needs to tell them this!

GFB:  That’s often true. However I think the teacher should be the one to judge how much technology to use and when. Occasionally we should show them really OLD technology like carving quill pens from turkey feathers, or making their own batteries from copper pennies and galvanized iron…

But you can’t do that with Value Added Measurements and rubrics testing whether you are on the Commin Core Crapiculum to the minute.

I wasn’t really giving THE or even A solution. I was objecting to the solution we are having imposed on us right now. If you want proposed solutions, here goes:

  1. Get people who don’t have actual, extensive teaching or research experience out of the command and control centers of education except as advisors.so, no Michelle Rhee, Andre Agassi, Arne Duncan, Billionaire Broad at the helm.
  2. For our poorer kids, make sure they have free, high quality wraparound services of every kind from the moment their mother notices she’s pregnant.
  3. So for example good well-qualified dentists, ophthalmologists, psychologists, general practitioners, and other doctors should come to each school and check eyes ears nose throat etc and give immunizations to every kid, no more than a single hour of class needs to be missed. If they get hurt on the playground or suddenly vomit in class, it’s really taken care of, right away.
  4. There should be all sorts of remedial help available for kids AS SOON AS help appears to be needed: eyesight, hearing, balance, coordination, mental math, memory improvement, spelling, reading, writing, walking, emotional difficulties, etc. (Right now, the provisions of ADA and IDEA are not funded, so school districts have an incentive to NOT diagnose those with deficiences or learning disabilities, because then they would have to take care of them. Charter schools for the most part just pretend that there are no IEPs.)
  5. Every kid gets a lot of ‘gross motor’ outdoor activities – not just team sports but also things like wilderness hikes, camping, horse care and riding, farming, boating. And music and drama and arts of all sorts – not just for the talented few, but everybody. Lots of after-school activities of these sorts.
  6. Teachers (and parents) should select their principals from among the ranks of the teachers. The principal should also teach, part-time.
  7. Teachers should have at least two years of education theory (and human psychology) and a full year and a half of student teaching, and at least a college major in their area, under experienced mentors. Teachers should be given help o0n how to defuse tense situations and child psychology, and should be chosen from the ranks of those showing
    1. academic promise and
    2. the ability to empathize and
    3. the ability to explain patiently and clearly.
  8. Classes should be much, much smaller. If 12:1 is good enough at Phillips Exeter Academy with their Harkness Tables, why not at Malcolm X ES in far Southeast Washington DC? And if it’s a hands on activity like a chemistry lab or using compasses & straightedges or making birdhouses, get an assistant or two so that it’s more like 3:1.
  9. Let the teachers wrangle over curriculum. State level is fine. County level is fine. School level is fine. To hell with these state-wide standardized tests and curricula, be they bubble type or click and drag.
  10. Actual hands-on vocational training that leads to actual jobs should be available to all who want it, and corporations must engage to hire those grads at decent rates of pay and with promises of additional training.
  11. State-college or  state-university higher education needs to be much, much cheaper. Student debt, like all other debt, should be dischargeable upon bankruptcy, and should be payoff able by many kinds of national service. (Exact provisions TBD, but teaching should definitely be one of those forms of national service. Payments and interest in limbo for the first X years, paid off at Y percent per year, fully paid off after Z years. Exact values of X, Y, Z are TBD.)
  12. Teachers should be paid well enough that they don’t need to get second jobs. Pay in DCPS is not the problem. Working conditions are the problem.
  13. I think that 3-4 hours of personal contact time with kids per day is enough. Planning for each class and heading papers can easily take 2x the amount of class time. So each paper turned in by a student should be returned the next day, marked intelligently.
  14. Since the bosses have their own organizations (NAM, Chamber of Commerce, ALEC, the Koch Brothers network, Council on Foreign Relations, the Cosmos Club, etc) so should the employees. Teachers’ unions should continue to exist but should be more democratic.
  15. Students should, in fact, be held responsible for their success or failure. It’s not all on the teacher, as it is now. Social promotion for a number of years is OK, many countries do it without bad effects, but there should be some sort of a test, I think, of all sorts: practical (eg drawing something, playing a musical piece, climbing a wall, drilling a hole, writing an essay, doing a proof, viewing something under the microscope, etc) as well as a pencil-and-paper or mouse-and-screen test of some sort. Not just arcane reading and math.
  16.  Those who don’t meet the mark should obviously be advised as to what their options are, and those options should be available and well-funded, whatever they might be.
  17. We should strike a balance between having kids go to their walk-to neighborhood schools and having truly integrated schools where each school has a mix of kids of all ethnic groups and incomes. How to do that, exactly , under our current mega-segregated urban patterns, is beyond me. The superhighways and redlinings of the last 80 years are not going to be overcome overnight, but having kids ride for hours to charter schools where there is no neighborhood connection – that’s not the answer.
  18. Anything I left out?

The Electoral College Should Be Retired or Abolished – Just Like Quill Pens, Buggy Whips, Powdered Wigs, and Slavery

I have just run the numbers, and it is true – the US Electoral College is one of the worst Gerrymanders imaginable.

Five times now, the winner of the total popular vote in the US ended up losing the election (1824, 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016). Clinton is now out-polling Trump by quite a bit (61.7 million to 60.4 million), but Trump is unfortunately probably going to win the presidency.

Just how perverse is the Electoral College? Beyond your wildest dreams.

I have just calculated that one party could WIN the presidency with only 31% of the total popular vote, while their opponents could LOSE the presidential election with 69% of the popular vote.

I am neither kidding nor exaggerating.

It comes from the fact that small states and voting territories like WY, DC, VT, ND, AK are wildly over-represented in the Electoral College. In Wyoming, each Elector represents a total population of about 177,000 people. In DC, each one represents 197,000 people. In Vermont, it’s 207,000 people per Elector.

But in large states like TX, FL, and CA, the population is grossly under-represented in the EC. In Texas, there are about 715,000 people per Elector – over FOUR TIMES as many as in Wyoming. In Florida, there are 679,000 people per Elector, and in California there are about 668,000 people per Elector.

The difference mostly comes from the fact that each state has two Senators, regardless of population.

So, if one party is able to win a whole bunch of smaller-population states with 51% of the vote in each one, and the other one wins the rest of the relatively-few larger-population states with a lopsided 90% of the vote in each one, it is possible for the first party to get to 285 electoral votes by only getting 37 million votes, while the opposition could get 83 million votes but lose the election because they only got 253 electoral college votes.

In a country with about 330 million people, the winners could get by with the votes of only TWELVE PERCENT of the population!!!

That is just plain perverse: Party A gets outvoted by a TWO-TO-ONE margin and still wins the presidency!?!?!?

It is time that we got rid of the electoral college, just like we got rid of buggy whips, blacksmiths on every corner, candlestick makers, and white powdered wigs. And slavery.

For the sake of this completely lopsided hypothetical election, I am assuming that the losing side got 90% of the vote in the following states: PA, WA, VA, IL, NC, NY, GA, AZ, CA, FL, and TX. That would give them a grand total of 253 electoral college votes – not enough – but a popular vote of over 83 million people. The winning side would win all of the other states by 51% to 49% margins, giving them 285 electoral votes but less than 37 million actual votes.

This cannot be tolerated any longer.

=======================================

Notes:

  • For the sake of simplicity, I am treating all of Nebraska and all of Maine as single states.
  • Don’t think that 90% votes are impossible. Here in Washington DC, Trump apparently got only about FOUR percent of the vote. Not 14%. Not 40%. But four per cent.
  • I am using the proportion of the population in each state that voted either Democrat or Republican in this last election as the baseline.
  •  Write me a note (in comments) if you want to see the entire spreadsheet and I can post it on Dropbox.
  • The idea for this column isn’t original, but the calculations are my own, and the numbers are based on this source and this one. I don’t recall what source I got the idea from, unfortunately, so I can’t give them credit. If you know who came up with this idea, please let me know.

 

Share this video with 5 friends. 

You need to view and share this John Oliver video.

Seriously.

Yes, share it with 5 people and watch the power of exponential growth — uh, pyramid schemes — like HerbaLife or Amway.

This entertaining but informative video shows how modern-day pyramid schemes work, but it doesn’t explain how they keep getting away with it.

If you join one of these MLMs, or pyramids, you make nothing by selling the product. You only earn by signing up new sales-people, who give you money. But to get the right to do that you have to buy a lot of product, which often ends up in garages or closets.

And here’s the kicker: if you actually do everything right as per the recommendations of the MLM scheme, you run out of human beings. This is classic exponential growth: the founder gets 5 salespeople to sell under him. Each one of them gets 5 more so that generation is 25 people. Then each of those gets 5, for 125, each time multiplying by 5.

I just had my calculator compute 5^10, which means 10 generations, which really doesn’t sound like that many levels,  and I got nearly 10 million people, larger than quite a few states in the USA. Ten generations of friends and coworkers and family getting friends and  coworkers and family members to sign up should only take a few months, right, at about a week per generation of suckers salespeople?

Then: After 15 generations my calculator says, uh, I’m having a hard time counting all the decimal places, because it reads 3.051758713E10, also known as 30,517,578,125.

Of course, that’s impossible. Most folks who get sucked into the MUlti-Level Marketing morass actually earn nothing at all — even by the companies’ own admissions. (See the video!) but they all buy a LOT of product, benefiting the people above them.but I think that means a bit over 30 BILLION people, with a B. Now, last time I checked, we only have about 7.4 billion human beings alive today. So, each and every single Homo sapiens on all seven continents or even sailing on the ocean or living on a remote island somewhere, would have to be a distributor/salesperson/supervisor/sucker, about four times over, just on level 15. If we add in all of the  people from levels 1 through 14, we actually get about 38 BILLION suckers customers dealers.

Why are these things still allowed? Is it because they have paid off some important legislators? On the face of it, pyramid schemes (think Ponzi) are all illegal. How do these companies continue to operate and prey on folks who dont know better?

What should teachers actually do?

Paul Thomas has some good suggestions for teachers, on how to do things that make a difference, without being a martyr and burning out. For example:

Take stock of how much of your professional and personal energy is being spent on being a professional and how much is drained by being a martyr—and then stop being a martyr. […]

“Every teacher must take stock of her/his professional practices, and eliminate those that are time and energy draining with little to no positive instructional outcomes. For example, marking extensively on student work, and then not requiring students to respond in some substantive way to those comments is an act of martyrdom—a waste of professional time that produces an artifact of your spending time, but doesn’t benefit either you or your students.”

I wish I had heard and heeded this advice when I was still teaching!

Read more here.

Published in: on November 4, 2016 at 8:29 am  Leave a Comment  
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