“And forgive our debts, as we forgive those who owe us!”

The title of this post might remind you of part of the so-called Lord’s Prayer, which in English is usually rendered “And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who have trespassed against us.”

This sounds like forgiving sins, but in Latin, which I studied for about six years, the prayer is really about forgiving debts:

“et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris”

I don’t know enough Greek to be able to comment on the original meaning of the words as apparently written down in the New Testament in that language, but it is generally accepted that Jesus (if he really existed) spoke Aramaic – but only a few of his (alleged) words were recorded in that language, since the entire NT was written in Greek, not in Hebrew or Latin, and definitely not in English!

The following book makes the argument that forgiving debts, wholesale, was essential if you wanted to avoid stratification of society into a class of oligarchs and a class of everybody else, who were essentially little better than slaves. They make the point that compounded interest grows exponentially and without limit, but economic growth does NOT: it follows a logistic curve at best, which means that there are certain limits.

For example, while bacteria growing in a petri dish appear to grow exponentially for some hours, perhaps for a few days, eventually, there is no more uncontaminated agar for the bacteria to eat, and they start drowning in their own waste products. So despite what one learns in most Algebra classes (including my own), bacterial growth is in actually logistic, not exponential. However, unless debt is periodically forgiven – which seldom if ever happens these days – the debtors end up drowning in debt, as you might be able to discern from this little graph I made:

logistic versus exponential growth

I haven’t read the book, but the review is most interesting. Here is a quote:

Nowhere, Hudson shows, is it more evident that we are blinded by a deracinated, by a decontextualizedunderstanding of our history than in our ignorance of the career of Jesus. Hence the title of the book: And Forgive Them Their Debts and the cover illustration of Jesus flogging the moneylenders — the creditors who do not forgive debts — in the Temple. For centuries English-speakers have recited the Lord’s Prayer with the assumption that they were merely asking for the forgiveness of their trespasses, their theological sins: “… and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us….” is the translation presented in the Revised Standard Version of the Bible. What is lost in translation is the fact that Jesus came “to preach the gospel to the poor … to preach the acceptable Year of the Lord”: He came, that is, to proclaim a Jubilee Year, a restoration of deror for debtors: He came to institute a Clean Slate Amnesty (which is what Hebrew דְּרוֹר connotes in this context).

So consider the passage from the Lord’s Prayer literally: … καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰ ὀφειλήματα ἡμῶν: “… and send away (ἄφες) for us our debts (ὀφειλήματα).” The Latin translation is not only grammatically identical to the Greek, but also shows the Greek word ὀφειλήματα revealingly translated as debita: … et dimitte nobis debita nostra: “… and discharge (dimitte) for us our debts (debita).” There was consequently, on the part of the creditor class, a most pressing and practical reason to have Jesus put to death: He was demanding that they restore the property they had rapaciously taken from their debtors. And after His death there was likewise a most pressing and practical reason to have His Jubilee proclamation of a Clean Slate Amnesty made toothless, that is to say, made merely theological: So the rich could continue to oppress the poor, forever and ever. Amen.

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Is Math Necessary?

This is worth reading. It’s a fact that we do NOT have a shortage of trained STEM grads, and it’s also true that very, very few people will ever use any concepts from advanced math in their work or in their day to day lives.
 
(As a former math teacher, I rejoice when I find a way to use relatively advanced math, eg algebra 2 or above, in the real world – which shows you that it doesn’t happen every day, even for someone who’s actively looking for it.)
 
So why do we require every single HS grad to master whatever the current Algebra 2 curriculum consists of?
via Mike Simpson  (remove)
In his new book The Math Myth: And Other STEM Delusions, political scientist Andrew Hacker proposes replacing algebra II and calculus in the high schoo …
SLATE.COM
Published in: on March 3, 2016 at 3:33 pm  Comments (2)  
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More Weird DC-CAS Questions

I began looking at the released 10th grade math questions today, and as usual I found some weird ones.

Here is one, where the only difference between answer C and D is the color scheme (D fits the colors in the graph, C doesn’t). Both of them have the math correct. Is the color scheme all that significant? Is that what we are testing for now?

Here’s another one, which merely asks students to tell the difference between a mean, a median, and a mode. Wait a second – isn’t that one of the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade standards?

Here are the exact wordings for the various “standards” that involve mean, median and mode:

For 6th grade: “6.DASP.1. Describe and compare data sets using the concepts of median, mean, mode, maximum and minimum, and range.”

For 7th grade: “7.DASP.1. Find, describe, and interpret appropriate measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and spread (range) that represent a set of data.”

For 8th grade: “8.DASP.1. Revisit measures of central tendency (mean, median, and mode) and spread (range) that represent a set of data and then observe the change in each when an “outlier” is adjoined to the data set or removed from it. Use these notions to compare different sets of data and explain how each can be useful in a different way to summarize socialphenomena such as price levels, clothing sizes, and athletic performances.”

And for Algebra 1: “AI.D.1. Select, create, and interpret an appropriate graphical representation (e.g., scatter plot, table, stem-and-leafplots, circle graph, line graph, and line plot) for a set of data, and use appropriate statistics (e.g., mean, median, range,and mode) to communicate information about the data. Use these notions to compare different sets of data.”

Why is DCPS testing such a low-level skill in Algebra 1? And why do we insist on loading the curriculum with the same eleventy-umpteen standards each year, only varying by an adjective or adverb or phrase or two? Is it because we assume that nothing at all gets learned in any year, so that teachers have to yet again re-teach EVERYTHING all over again, starting from nothing?

Published in: on March 23, 2011 at 12:28 pm  Comments (1)  
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