Arne Duncan is Leaving

I am pleased to report that Arne Duncan is stepping down as the US Secretary of Education. I wish he was being fired and disgraced, because he has done more to destroy and resegregate public education than any other individual. Except Barack Obama, who appointed him.

Good riddance. But his replacement is not likely to be better: John King, who was utterly indifferent to parent complaints about over-testing.

(PS – sorry for the original typos. Trying to write a post via my iPhone is asking for errors galore.)

Corrected List of Closed or Failed DC Charter Schools

A couple of days ago I posted a list, put out by CMD, of over 40 charter schools in Washington, DC that have closed over the past few years. Apparently the list had a few errors; Mary Levy sent me a corrected list, from the DC Public Charter School Board itself, which I attach here. You will have to click on the link to see the whole thing.

Charter school closure table – Last Updated 3 11 2013

Or, if you prefer, here it is in images:

failed and closed charter schools redux

failed and closed 2

failed and closed 3

Failed Charter Schools in DC

I learned from the indefatigable Peter Greene just now that a group called CMD has done some serious data crunching and has come up with a list of about 2500 charter schools across the nation that have failed and closed. Some took millions of federal and state dollars and never served a single student.

Here is a map of just the ones in Washington, DC. Looking at the map, I count about forty failed charter schools in my fair city; however the spreadsheet has 49. If you are a veteran Washingtonian, how many of them can you name just by looking at the map? If you go to the actual web page you can get names and so on. I see that the state of Arizona alone has over 340 such failed ventures into edupreneurship; Florida 305, and Michigan has 120, and Ohio may be the leader with 425 failed and closed charter scams schools.

failed charter schools in dc

(BTW, the teachers in those failed charter schools were generally very hard-working, passionate people who are not trying to make a million bucks. Charter school operators? That’s a different story.)

Here is the DC list:

Name / Year founded / Year failed / Enrollment during last year / Address

failed charter schools dc list

Where have all the teachers gone?

A lot of them have retired (like me) or quit in disgust. This writer collected comments from dozens of teachers around the nation who explained why they retired early or quit teaching altogether because they could not stand the direction that American education has taken.

Very worthwhile reading.

With Friends Like These …

With Friends Like These…

(public education doesn’t need enemies!)

An assessment by Ken Derstine of the overhaul of ESEA / NCLB / ECAA act. Here is the link:

Weekly Roundup of Educational Resistance by Bob Schaeffer

{As usual, this list is collected and distributed by Bob Schaeffer, not by me.}

The U.S. Senate has joined the House of Representatives in responding to growing, grassroots pressure by voting to overhaul “No Child Left Behind” (NCLB). The bills passed by both the Senate and House reflect widespread rejection of failed top-down, test-and-punish strategies as well as the “NCLB on steroids” waiver regime dictated by Arne Duncan. While neither version is close to perfect from an assessment reform perspective, each makes significant progress by rolling back federally mandated high-stakes, eliminating requirements to evaluate educators based on student test scores, and recognizing opt-out rights. FairTest and its allies will closely monitor the conference committee working on compromise language to make sure the gains remain in the final bill sent to President Obama — the alternative is to keep the yoke of NCLB-and-waivers in place for at least two more years, if not much longer. Meanwhile, organizers in many states are keeping the spotlight on the problems of test overuse and misuse, modeling better practices and winning additional policy victories.

Remember that back issues of these weekly updates are archived at:

National End High-Stakes Testing to Help Fix Public Education: Key Civil Rights Leader
National U.S. Senate Rejects Proposal to Give Federal Government More Say in Identifying “Failing” Schools
National Both House and Senate NCLB Overhaul Bills Allow for Penalty-Free Test Opt Out
National “Race to the Top:” Lofty Promises and Top-Down Regulation Brought Few Good Changes to America’s Schools

Exit Exam on Way Out

Two Small Districts Set Opt Out Records

Opposition Coalesces Against Smarter Balanced Tests

Governor Vetoes Opt-Out Bill; State PTA Pushed for Override Vote

More than 10,000 Young People Who Did Not Pass Grad. Test Recently Received Diplomas

Hawaii Teachers Fight Evaluations Based on Student Test Scores

Why Common Core Tests Are Harmful to Students

Third-Grade Promotion Test Pushes Reading Down Into Kindergarten

Fight to Make Charter School Disclose What Test It Uses for Kindergarten Entry

Test Cuts Came After Thorough Debate

Exam Scores Don’t Tell Full Story of Teacher Preparedness

Time Allocated to New State Tests Cut in Half

Nevada After Testing System Breakdown, State to Hire New Assessment Vendor

New Hampshire Schools Can Replace Smarter Balanced Tests with ACT or SAT

New Jersey
Be Wary of New State Teacher Ratings

New Mexico
Court Rejects Suit Seeking to Strip Pearson’s Common Core Testing Contract

New York
High School Models Authentic Assessment
New York Opt Out Movement Plans to Ratchet Up Actions Against Standardized Exam Overkill
New York Pending NCLB Overhaul Offers Hope to Reduce State’s Testing Obsession

North Carolina State’s Largest District Cuts Back Local Test Mandates
North Carolina Cautions About Test-Score-Based Teacher Pay

Students Can Meet Graduation Requirement with Work Samples in Their Home Language

Questions Mount About Using Volatile Test Results to Evaluate Teachers and Schools
Pennsylvania Teachers to School Board: Standardized Testing is Harming Students

Rhode Island
What Tests Like PARCC Do Not Measure

Teachers School Governor on Testing and Evaluations
Tennessee Local School Board to Take Up Opt Out Resolution

New Test Leading Fewer to Get GEDs

Washington State Testing Revolt Pushes State Into Uncharted Waters
Washington Over-Testing is a Flawed Strategy

“How Many Tests Can a Child Withstand?” — with apologies to Bob Dylan

The Beatings in Education Will Continue Until Morale Improves

Bob Schaeffer, Public Education Director
FairTest: National Center for Fair & Open Testing
office-   (239) 395-6773   fax-  (239) 395-6779
mobile- (239) 699-0468

ASD Reformers Claim They Can Achieve The Impossible

Gary Rubinstein has watched a conclave of uber school reformers in places like New Orleans and Tennessee, so that you don’t have to.

He discovers some amazing things about their amazing claims of success:

1. They don’t have any secret recipes (other than firing lots of teachers and turning the schools over to private entities)

2. These claims of success are not actually backed up by any data

3. For the most part, these outlandish promises (like going from the bottom 5% to the top 25% in 5 years) are simply advertisements designed to get money

Here’s the link:

Definitely worth reading.

A Quick Look at the National Academy of Science report on Mayoral Control of Schools in Washington DC

Last week, the National Academy of Science released a very long report assessing the progress (or lack of it) of the education of young people in Washington DC under mayoral control in both the regular public schools and in the charter schools.


The picture isn’t pretty, as Candi Peterson has pointed out.


Here are my major conclusions:

1. Mayoral control of schools has been a spectacular failure if you care anything about reducing the gaps between achievement levels of white students and those of color, the poor, special ed students, and English language learners (i.e. immigrants). The gaps between the pass rates on the DC-CAS standardized tests of those groups under mayoral control or the PERAA (Public Education Reform Amendment Act) are enormous and have essentially remained unchanged since 2007, when the law was implemented, according to the data in this report. Note that the report combines the data for both the DC public schools and charter schools, combined, at all grade levels, in both reading and math. Here are two graphs, made by me from data in the report, which show the lack of change. I estimated the percentage of students ‘proficient’ or ‘advanced’ in each of the groups (whites, blacks, hispanics, students receiving free or reduced-price lunches, English language learners, and special education students) from graphs provided by the report, and then subtracted the pass rates from each other. HIGH NUMBERS ARE BAD because they show large gaps in proficiency rates. Low numbers are good. Notice that there has been almost no change since mayoral control; some lines go up a tiny bit, some go down a bit, others waver back and forth a bit. Not a success story.
gap[s under mayoral control, math, dc-cas, acc to NAP report on PERAAgaps under mayoral control, reading, acc to national academies press
2. Ratings for teachers remain very much dependent on what students they teach. Many millions of dollars and enormous effort has been spent to devise supposedly scientific ways of measuring teacher effectiveness — i.e. VAM and IMPACT. Every single teacher remaining in DCPS has either been hired under Their Chancellorships or has been repeatedly measured as efffective or better. Yet the ratings for teachers at schools with high poverty rates, and in wards 7 and 8, remain much lower than those at schools with low poverty rates and in ward 3. Repeat: these low-ranked teachers are not holdovers from the ‘bad old days’ – they are either brand-new hires or have been repeatedly measured as good or excellent under IMPACT. (One bit of data: at my last school, from which I retired 5 years ago and which has over 100 faculty and administrators, only about 5 or 6 teachers remain from my time there.) I copied these two tables directly from the report:
teac her ratings under IMPACT, by ward teacher ratings under impact by ses
3. Now that we have 60-odd publicly-funded local school districts in Washington DC, most of which [the charter schools] are not required to provide much of anything in the way of data, we no longer have any effective way of saying what are good practices and which are poor practices, because we have no city-wide way of describing what is going on.
4. The report generally omits any data from before 2007, and in some cases before 2009, which makes it hard to compare pre-mayoral control and post-MC. The exceptions are with some NAEP data, in which it is clear that any progress post-PERAA is indistinguishable from progress before PERAA. See these four graphs, which could have been taken from my blog but are again from the National Academy of Science report (I added the stuff in red for emphasis):
pre-post mayoral control naep scores 4th grade math pre-post mayoral control naep scores 4th grade reading pre-post mayoral control naep scores 8th grade math pre-post mayoral control naep scores 8th grade reading
5. The report totally omits the contractual obligations entered into by Rhee and Henderson with the Broad, Arnold and other foundations back in 2007 when they laid out 60-some goals they said they would meet by 2014. As you may recall from looking at my blog or what Erich Martel wrote on the topic, their success rate in meeting those goals (regarding things like NAEP and CAS scores for the most part) was approximately TWO PERCENT. Not 20%. But 2%. And I was being generous.
6. Finally, despite all the really damning data in the report, I predict that the Washington Post and others of their mindset will proclaim that it shows that mayoral control has been a wonderful success.
PS, here is the link so that you can download your own copy of the 341-page report:

A closer look at charter and regular public school enrollments, percentages of students at risk, and percentages of students ‘proficient’

Here is another look at the brand-new data concerning four variables in the District of Columbia schools, about which I wrote a couple of days ago. The difference here is that the dots representing the schools are more-or=less proportional to the size of the student body.

1. Is this a regular public school, or a charter school (blue or red):

2. What fraction of the kids at that school are officially considered to be At Risk? (That’s the scale along the x-axis at the bottom of the page)

3. What is the average percentage of the kids at that school are ‘proficient’ in reading and math on the DC-CAS? (That’s the scale along the y-axis at the left-hand side of the page)

4. How big is the school? (That’s the size of the dot, more or less; the legend is at the bottom left-hand corner of the graph)

Time spent looking carefully at this graph will be well-spent. If you click on it, it will expand.

It will certainly show that charter schools have not revolutionized education for the better in DC: for both types of schools, there remains a very strong, negative correlation between the percentages of kids At Risk and ‘pass’ rates on the DC-CAS.

Note that most schools have between 200 and 500 students and that most of the ones that are smaller are actually charter schools. As I wrote a couple of days ago, the schools with the largest fraction of At-Risk students (say, over 2/3 of the student body) are almost all regular DC public schools.

On the second graph, which is otherwise identical to the first, I’ve labeled some of the larger schools.

fixed bicolor, size of school and at risk vs average dc cas 2014 proficiency, both regular public and charter, dc

Here is the one with names of some of the larger schools, so you can see how individual schools fall on this graph.

(Sorry, I there was not enough room to label every single one, and my non-existent HTML skills won’t allow me to make it so that any of the dots are clickable. If any of my readers know how to do that and would like to offer to make that happen, then please let me know in the comments.)

again fixed and revised names and bicolor, size of school and at risk vs average dc cas 2014 proficiency, both regular public and charter, dc

And here is the entire data table. So you can see where every single school lies on these three dimensions.

(PS: I added a few more names of schools and corrected four other small errors, two pointed out by an alert reader.. 2/22/2015)

Listing of Educational Bloggers

This is a list of the blogs maintained at the present time by some fellow-activist teachers and others.


A Teacher on Teaching A Teacher on Teaching
Aaron Barlow Aaron Barlow or
Accountable Talk Accountable Talk
Adam Bessie Automated Teaching Machine
Alan Singer Alan Singer
Alexandra Miletta Alexandra Miletta
Alice Mercer Reflections on Teaching
Allan Jones Allan Jones
Amy Moore Amy Moore
Andy Spears Tennessee Education Report
Ani McHugh Teacherbiz
Ann Policelli Cronin Ann Policelli Cronin
Anne Tenaglia Teacher’s Lessons Learned
Anthony Cody Anthony Cody
Arthur Getzel The Public Educator (aka liberalteacher)
Arthur Goldstein NYCEducator
Arthur H. Camins Arthur H. Camins
Audrey Amrein-Beardsley VAMboozled
Aurelio M. Montemayor Parent Leadership in Education
Badass Teachers Association (Marla Kilfoyle, Melissa Tomlinson) Badass Teachers Association and
Barbara Madeloni Educators for a Democratic Union
Barbara McClanahan readingdoc
Betsy Combier Parent Advocatees
Big Education Ape Big Education Ape
Bill Betzen School Achieve Project
Bill Boyle Educarenow
Bob Sikes Scathing Purple Musings
Bob Valiant Defend-Ed
Bonnie Cunard Continuing Change or
Bonny Buffington BBBloviations
Brett Bymaster Stop Rocketship
Brett Dickerson Life At the Intersections
Brian Cohen Making the grade blog
Brian Redmond rsbandman
Bruce Baker School Finance 101
Bruce Bowers Reflections on teaching and learning
Carol Burris Carol Burris and Answer Sheet
Chaz Chaz’s School Daze
Chris Cerrone Children should not be a number
Chris Guerrieri Jaxkidsmatter
Chris Thinnes Chris Thinnes
Christian Goering Edusanity
Christopher Martell On Social Studies and Education
Christopher Tienken Christopher Tienken
Christopher Wooleyhand Common Sense School Leadership
Claudia Swisher Claudia Swisher
Cynthia Liu K12NN News Network
Dan McConnell Truth and Consequences
Daniel Katz Daniel Katz
Darcie Cimarusti Mother Crusader
David Chura Kids in the System
David Cohen InterACT:  Accomplished California Teacher
David Ellison A Teacher’s Mark’s
Debbie Forward PFF Faculty Lounge
Deborah McCallum Big Ideas in Education
Deborah Meier Deborah Meier
Demian Godon Reconsidering TFA
Derek Black Education Law Prof Blog
Diane Aoki The Teacher I Want to Be
Diane Ravitch Diane Ravitch
DOE Nutes DOE Nuts Blog
Don Russell Lifting The Curtain
Dora Taylor Seattle Education
Doug Martin Doug Martin 
Edward Berger Edward Berger
Elizabeth Rose Yo Miz
Francesco Portelos Educator Fights Back  or Don’t Tread on Educators or
Fred Klonsky Fred Klonsky
Gary Rubinstein Gary Rubinstein
Gene Glass Education in Two Words
George Schmidt Substance News
George Wood George Wood
Gerri Songer Gerri Song
Glen Brown Teacher Poet Musician
Good Morning Art Teacher Good Morning Art Teacher
Greg Mild Plumberbund
Guy Brandenburg Guy Brandenburg
Helen Gym Philadelphia Public School Notebook
Jack McKay Horace Mann League Blog
James Arnold Dr. James Arnold
James Avington Miller, Jr The War Report on Public Education and
James Boutin An Urban Teachers Education
James Chascherrie Stop Common Core in Washington State
James Hamric Hammy’s Education Blog
Jan Resseger Jan Resseger
Jane Nixon Willis Staying Strong in School
Jason France Crazy Crawfish
Jason L. Endacott EduSanity
Jason Stanford Jason Stanford
Jeff Bryant Jeff Bryant
Jen Hogue V.A.M. It!
Jennifer Berkshire EduShyster
Jesse Hagopian Jesse Hagopian
Jessie Ramey Yinzercation
Jill Conroy The Indignant Teacher
Jo Lieb Poetic Justice
Joe Bower For the love of learning
John J. Viall A Teacher on Teaching
John Kuhn EdGator
John Young Transparent Christina
Jonathan Lovell Jonathan Lovell’s Blog
Jonathan Pelto Wait, What?
Jose Vilson Jose Vilson
Joshua Block Joshua Block
Julian Vasquez Heilig Cloaking Inquity
Justin Aion Relearning to Teach
Karren Harper Royal Edutalknola
Katie Lapham Critical Classrooms
Ken Derstine Defend Public Education
Ken Previti Reclaim Reform
Kenneth Bernstein Teacher Ken
Kevin Welner Kevin Welner and
Lani Cox The Missing Teacher
Larry Cuban Larry Cuban
Larry Feinberg Keystone State Education Coalition
Lee Barrios Geauxteacher
Leonard Isenberg Perdaily
Leonie Haimson Class Size Matters
Levi B Cavener Idahospromise
Linda Thomas Restore Reason
Lisa Guisbond Fairtest
Lloyd Lofthouse Crazy Normal the classroom expose  or
Lucianna Sanson The War Report on Public Education
M. Shannon Hernandez My Final 40 Days
Marie Corfield Marie Corfield
Marion Brady Marion Brady
Mark Naison With a Brooklyn Accent and Dump Duncan and
Mark Weber Jersey Jazzman
Martha Infante Martha Infante
Matt Farmer Matt Farmer
Mel Katz The Education Activist: From Student to Teacher
Melissa Westbrook Seattle Schools Community Forum
Mercedes Schneider Deutsch29
Michael Klonsky Michael Klonsky and
Michelle Gunderson Education Matters
Mike Deshotels Louisiana Educator
Mike Rose Mike Rose’s Blog
Mike Warner Education Under Attack
Minnsanity Minnsanity
Morna McDermott Education Alchemy
Mrs. Fanning LA Woman
Ms Kate Ms Katie’s Ramblings
Nancy Bailey Nancy Bailey’s Education Website
Nancy Flanagan Teacher in a Strange Land
Nicholas Tampio Nicholas Tampio
Nikhil Goyal Nikhil Goyal
Norm Scott Ed Notes Online
Ogo Okoye-Johnson Ogo Okoye-Johnson
OK Education Truth okeducationtruths
Outside The Box Outside the Box 
Patrick Walsh
Paul Horton Education News
Paul Thomas The becoming radical
Peggy Robertson Peg with Pen
Perdido St School Perdido St School
Peter DeWitt Peter DeWitt
Peter Goodman Ed in the Apple
Peter Greene Curmudgucation
Phillip Cantor Sustainable Education Transformation
Rachael Stickland Student Privacy Matters
Rachel Levy All Things Education
Ralph Ratto Opine I will
Ray Salazar The White Rino
Rob Miller View From the Edge
Rob Panning-Miller Public Education Justice Alliance of Minnesota
Robert Cotto Jr. The Cities, Suburbs & Schools Project
Robert D. Skeels Solidaridad
Russ Walsh Russ on Reading
Ruth Conniff Public School Shakedown
Sam Chaltain Sam Chaltain
Sara Roos Sara Roos
Sarah Blaine Parenting the core
Sarah Darer Littman Sarah Darer Littman
Sarah Lahm Sarah Lahm
Save Public Education Save Public Education
Sharon Higgins Charter School Scandals
Shaun Johnson Chalk Face
Sherman Dorn Sherman Dorn
South Bronx School South Bronx School
Stephanie Rivera Teacher Under Construction
Stephen Dyer 10th Period
Stephen Krashen Stephen Krashen and
Steve Hinnefeld Steve Hinnefeld
Steve O’Donoghue Steve O’Donogue
Steve Strieker One Teachers Perspective
Steven Singer Gad Fly On the Wall Blog
Stu Bloom Live Long and Prsoper
Sullio The Pen is Mightier than the Person
Susan DuFresne Educating the Gates Foundation
Susan DuFresne and Katie Lapham Teachers Letters to Bill Gates
Susan Ohanian Susan Ohanian
TB Furman tbfurman
TC Dad Gone Wild
Teacher Reality Teacher Reality
Teacher Tom Teacher Tom
Ted Cohen Newark Schools For Sale
The Assailed Teacher
The Teaching Nomad The Teaching Nomad 
Tim Slekar Busted Pencils 
Tom Aswell Louisiana Voice
Tracy Novick Who-cester Blog
Ty Alper Ty Alper (SF School Board candidate) or
Urban Ed Urban Ed
Vanessa Vaile Precarious Faculty Blog or
Wag the Dog Wag the Dog
Walt Gardner Walt Garnder
Wayne Gersen Network Schools
Wendy Lecker Wendy Lecker
Xian Barrett Xian Barrett
Yohuru Williams Yohuru Williams
Yong Zhao Education in the Age of Globalization

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